Santa Claus Accidents in the Washington DC Area

By Cory Bilton

Santa's_Portrait_1881

Everything about Santa Claus points to the conclusion that he’s an accident waiting to happen. I’ve only seen him once, about 30 years ago, but I remember he was an older gentleman with poor eyesight. He operates a non-traditional vehicle without proper safety equipment (no headlights, turn signals, or seatbelts). I’m skeptical that Santa has the appropriate operator’s license. His vehicle is pulled by draft animals that are considered wild. He drives at night, when darkness makes it harder to see. From many accounts, his sleigh exceeds weight limits for roadways and rooftops. He drives on roads, front yards, and roofs without regard to traffic regulations or private property. Santa Claus is a danger to public safety.

So you may be wondering, what do you do when Santa Claus negligently injures you or damages your property? Suppose Santa fails to yield the right-of-way to your vehicle, or the weight of his sleigh collapses the roof of your home? What recourse do you have?  Here are some tips for residents of the Washington, DC area when pursuing a claim for personal injury or property damage against Santa Claus.

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From Representing the Injured to Grilling Sandwiches: Interview with Bruce Klores

By Cory Bilton

GCDC

A couple of months ago, I met Bruce Klores. Bruce’s recent claim to fame is opening Washington, DC’s first grilled cheese restaurant, GCDC. But prior to opening a restaurant, Bruce spent a long career as a personal injury attorney representing plaintiffs in medical malpractice cases. I recently sat down with Bruce to learn more about his restaurant, his legal practice, and his reasons for starting a second career.

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Taking Traumatic Brain Injuries Seriously – Lessons from the NFL

By Cory Bilton

Beltway 1

When I was about 10 years old, I once made the mistake of slamming on my front-wheel brake on my bicycle. I launched up over the handlebars and crashed head-first into the street, wearing no helmet. I don’t remember hitting the ground. Fortunately, neighbors saw my crash and called 911 as I lay unconscious in the roadway. For weeks after the incident, I had a huge knot on the side of my head. My doctor said that after a concussion such as mine, I should go slow, limit my activities, and rest my brain as much as possible.

I remember having to sit on the sidelines each day in gym class while I recovered. My gym teacher openly mocked me in front of my classmates, calling me “hematoma boy.” My gym teacher must have thought that my forced-nonactivity was unnecessary or a maybe a ruse. Maybe he thought the magnitude of my injury was too small to warrant any limitation on my physical activity. Maybe he thought I should just “walk it off.”

Even today, more than 20 years later, there is a still tension between people that think all head injuries should be taken very seriously and those that think concussions aren’t a big deal. However, the debate is increasingly one-sided. Evidence is building that shows my doctor was right and my gym teacher was wrong: concussions should be taken very seriously.

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